Poland, Committee In Support Of Solidarity, 1982, January 2

Press Advisory
January 2, 1982
Committee In Support Of Solidarity

SPECIAL EDITION
CONTACT: Chris Wilcock, Agnieszka Kolakowska, 929-6966

Rights of Prisoners

According to the December 20, 1981, dictates of the Minister of Justice:

1. The closest relative or friend of the prisoner should be notified immediately of his place of detention.

2. Food, etc., may be brought twice each month for 1,000 zlotys.

3. Two packages each month are allowed, each of 6 pounds; money can be sent to the prisoners as well as censored correspondence.

4. One 60-minute visit is allowed with the prisoner's closest friend or relative or other person, only with the permission of the officer in charge of the isolation center, the military commander, or the regional police office.

5. One hour's daily exercise is allowed.

6. Unlimited unsupervised legal consultation is allowed. (The lawyer receives full power of attorney from the prisoner's closest friend or relative.)

[THE FOLLOWING ITEM REFERS TO THE LARGE DEFECTIONS FROM THE POLISH COMMUNIST PARTY THAT HAVE BEEN REPORTED.]

TRUTH OR JOKE?

After the declaration of the state of war, a funeral procession delivered a coffin to the Communist Party's Regional Committee building in Bydgoszcz. The Committee first sent it out to a bomb squad to investigate. It turned out that there were no explosives in the coffin. The coffin was opened, it was found that it contained stacks of party cards.

WRONA WILL NOT CRUSH US!

[THIS MOTTO HAS CONCLUDED EVERY INFORMATION SERVICE OF SOLIDARITY. WRONA, IS THE ACRONYM FOR "MILITARY COUNCIL OF NATIONAL SALVATION," WHICH ALSO MEANS "CROW" IN POLISH.]

* * *

The New York information center of the Committee in Support of Solidarity is in regular contact with Solidarity sources in Europe, including those in Stockholm, London, and Paris. Reports from those sources come to the New York office by telephone, and are translated immediately.

Solidarity sources in Europe gather information by monitoring communications in Poland; by interviewing Polish emigres and foreign travelers allowed to leave; and from other sources.

The following items are the most recent reported through the date above. For past reports, contact the New York office.

275 Seventh Avenue, Twenty-Fifth Floor / New York, New York 10001
(212) 989-0909 / Press: Contact ( 212) 929-6966
CONTACT: Chris Wilcock, Agnieszka Kolakowska, 929-6966

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